Happy with this girl again. :D  (at Shakey’s)

Happy with this girl again. :D (at Shakey’s)

Displacement, Refugees and Asylum Service are reflected on in this installation. From 1975-79, Cambodians were displaced and relocated from their homes. During the Pol Pot Regime, more than a million have been crowded in Phnom Penh. From 1979-1992, thousands still are found in refugee camps or fled overseas. Today, many are still displaced due to ‘socio-economic’ development. In the world today, millions are fleeing their country due to war and poverty; many seek refuge in other countries. Immigration issues are moral issues. Pope Francis has taken his stand on forced migration of peoples from all over the world. Thus sculpture at the Jesuit Refugee Service at the Reflection Centre in Siem Reap. Notice the first figure fleeing with one leg? That’s the sculptor himself, he who experienced displacement. Inset is a woman carrying a child. Many are displaced children (see unaccompanied children who are fleeing Latin America seeking asylum in the US). 18 September 2014 #immigration #displacement #jesuits #Refugees (at The Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf Naia Terminal 3)

Displacement, Refugees and Asylum Service are reflected on in this installation. From 1975-79, Cambodians were displaced and relocated from their homes. During the Pol Pot Regime, more than a million have been crowded in Phnom Penh. From 1979-1992, thousands still are found in refugee camps or fled overseas. Today, many are still displaced due to ‘socio-economic’ development. In the world today, millions are fleeing their country due to war and poverty; many seek refuge in other countries. Immigration issues are moral issues. Pope Francis has taken his stand on forced migration of peoples from all over the world. Thus sculpture at the Jesuit Refugee Service at the Reflection Centre in Siem Reap. Notice the first figure fleeing with one leg? That’s the sculptor himself, he who experienced displacement. Inset is a woman carrying a child. Many are displaced children (see unaccompanied children who are fleeing Latin America seeking asylum in the US). 18 September 2014 #immigration #displacement #jesuits #Refugees (at The Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf Naia Terminal 3)

To promote reconciliation, the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS-Cambodia) worked with Buddhist monks as one of the ways to end war, exile and promote peace. With MahaGhosananda, a holy monk, Bob Maat and Liz Bernstein began to organize the Dhammayietra (Peace Walk). The first was in 1992, then in 1993, the walk to Phnom Penh led to a peaceful election after the Pol Pot Regime. This mural, carved by Siem Reap artist, Channa, depicts the Dhamma wheel, the logo of the Peace Walk, being pushed by Buddhist monks, Catholic priests and nuns, those in wheelchairs, and other peacemakers as they walk to promote non-violence. Bishop Kike Figaredo SJ is one of the people carved in the mural. 14 September 2013 (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

To promote reconciliation, the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS-Cambodia) worked with Buddhist monks as one of the ways to end war, exile and promote peace. With MahaGhosananda, a holy monk, Bob Maat and Liz Bernstein began to organize the Dhammayietra (Peace Walk). The first was in 1992, then in 1993, the walk to Phnom Penh led to a peaceful election after the Pol Pot Regime. This mural, carved by Siem Reap artist, Channa, depicts the Dhamma wheel, the logo of the Peace Walk, being pushed by Buddhist monks, Catholic priests and nuns, those in wheelchairs, and other peacemakers as they walk to promote non-violence. Bishop Kike Figaredo SJ is one of the people carved in the mural. 14 September 2013 (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

Exiting the South Gate of Angkor Thom (late 12th to early 13th c) The south gate of Angkor Thom is the best preserved among the gates. It is approached from outside via a causeway that extends about fifty meters across a moat. On each side of the causeway are railings fashioned with 54 stone figures engaged in the performance of a famous Hindu story: the myth of the Churning of the Ocean. On the left side of the moat, 54 ‘devas’ (guardian gods) pull the head of the snake ‘Shesha’ while on the right side 54 ‘asuras’ (demon gods) pull the snake’s tail in the opposite direction. In this myth, the body of the snake is wrapped around the central mountain—Mt. Meru—perhaps corresponding here to the Bayon temple at the center of the site. In any case, the myth relates that as the Devas pulled the snake in one direction and the gods pushed in the other, the ocean began to churn and precipitate the elements. By alternating back and forth, the ocean was ‘milked’, forming the earth and the cosmos anew. Angkor Thom, Siem Reap, Cambodia. 13 September 2014 (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

Exiting the South Gate of Angkor Thom (late 12th to early 13th c) The south gate of Angkor Thom is the best preserved among the gates. It is approached from outside via a causeway that extends about fifty meters across a moat. On each side of the causeway are railings fashioned with 54 stone figures engaged in the performance of a famous Hindu story: the myth of the Churning of the Ocean. On the left side of the moat, 54 ‘devas’ (guardian gods) pull the head of the snake ‘Shesha’ while on the right side 54 ‘asuras’ (demon gods) pull the snake’s tail in the opposite direction. In this myth, the body of the snake is wrapped around the central mountain—Mt. Meru—perhaps corresponding here to the Bayon temple at the center of the site. In any case, the myth relates that as the Devas pulled the snake in one direction and the gods pushed in the other, the ocean began to churn and precipitate the elements. By alternating back and forth, the ocean was ‘milked’, forming the earth and the cosmos anew. Angkor Thom, Siem Reap, Cambodia. 13 September 2014 (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

Elephants and modern vehicles ply the roads to and from the Bayon Temple. The elephant here leads towards the Exit at the ancient South Gate. Angkor, Siem Reap, Cambodia. 14 September 2014 (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

Elephants and modern vehicles ply the roads to and from the Bayon Temple. The elephant here leads towards the Exit at the ancient South Gate. Angkor, Siem Reap, Cambodia. 14 September 2014 (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

You can ride these elephants when you’re in the vicinity of the Bayon Temple, Angkor, Cambodia. 16 September 2014 (at Ateneo De Manila High School)

You can ride these elephants when you’re in the vicinity of the Bayon Temple, Angkor, Cambodia. 16 September 2014 (at Ateneo De Manila High School)

Our @musicachiesa ‘s Christmas album, Isang Pamaskong Anyaya, is almost done! Mastering and then replicating! Out soon at your favorite record stores! Watch Musica Chiesa’s concert before Christmas! Announcement soon! @jescomph #music #Jesuit #christmas #album @kwinsi @robbiegrande Carlo Tuazon @mbulaong2002 (at Jesuit Communications, Ateneo De Manila University)

This is the “back” of the Bayon Temple, built in the late 12th or early 13th century, as the official state temple of the Mahayana Buddhist King Jayavarman VII. The Bayon Temple is at the centre of the Jayavarman’s Angkor Thom, the capital. Because the Bayon Temple is at the centre, all roads leads to it from each of the cardinal points of the city. This temple has no moats, like those of Angkor Wat; the city that surrounds it protects the temple. Angkor, Siem Reap, Cambodia. 13 September 2014 #angkor #cambodia #sacredplaces #siemreap  (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

This is the “back” of the Bayon Temple, built in the late 12th or early 13th century, as the official state temple of the Mahayana Buddhist King Jayavarman VII. The Bayon Temple is at the centre of the Jayavarman’s Angkor Thom, the capital. Because the Bayon Temple is at the centre, all roads leads to it from each of the cardinal points of the city. This temple has no moats, like those of Angkor Wat; the city that surrounds it protects the temple. Angkor, Siem Reap, Cambodia. 13 September 2014 #angkor #cambodia #sacredplaces #siemreap (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

At the centre of the walled city of Angkor Thom is the Bayon Temple. It is said that the Bayon Temple is the intersection of heaven and earth. Bayon is known for its huge stone faces of the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. Each one facing outward and keeping watch at all corner points. The images are curiously smiling, so they are “popularly known as the Mona Lisa of Southeast Asia.” This photo is the front of the Bayon Temple. Next post is the back of the temple. Angkor Thom, Siem Reap, Cambodia. 13 September 2014 #angkor #cambodia #asiancivilizations #sacredplaces (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

At the centre of the walled city of Angkor Thom is the Bayon Temple. It is said that the Bayon Temple is the intersection of heaven and earth. Bayon is known for its huge stone faces of the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara. Each one facing outward and keeping watch at all corner points. The images are curiously smiling, so they are “popularly known as the Mona Lisa of Southeast Asia.” This photo is the front of the Bayon Temple. Next post is the back of the temple. Angkor Thom, Siem Reap, Cambodia. 13 September 2014 #angkor #cambodia #asiancivilizations #sacredplaces (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

This is the South Gate to Angkor Thom. This gate is mostly used by tourists like me. This is the entrance to the Bayon Temple, Angkor, Cambodia. 13 September 2014 (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)

This is the South Gate to Angkor Thom. This gate is mostly used by tourists like me. This is the entrance to the Bayon Temple, Angkor, Cambodia. 13 September 2014 (at Jesuit Residence, Ateneo de Manila University)